Physical Education Aims and Objectives

Aim of Physical Education – The ultimate goal or direction is referred to as an aim, it point out way. It is final end. Aim is achieved some certain objectives.

Aim of physical education, like general education, is to develop human personality in its totality well planned activity programs. In some words, physical education aim at the all round development of the personality of an individual or wholesome development of human personality and it includes physical, mental, social, emotional and moral aspects to make an individual a good citizen who is able to make contribution in process of nation in one’s own way. Thus physical education means at making an individual physical fit, mentally alert, emotionally balanced, socially well adjusted, morally true and spiritually uplifted.

Objectives of Physical Education – Objectives are steps considered towards the attainment of the aim. They are the particular and precise means employed to realize an aim. The moment an aim is achieved it becomes an objective in the action that goal on continuing.

The three Objectives of physical education are –

1. The objective of physical fitness – It refers to that state where an individual has developed great endurance, speed, strength etc. Physical fitness is essential to leading a happy, vigorous and abundant life.

2. The objective of social efficiency – It concerned with one’s proper adaptation to group living. Physical education activities provides ample opportunities to develop traits such as cooperation, respect to others, loyalty, sportsmanship, self confidence etc. All these qualities help a person to make him a good citizen.

3. The objective of culture – It aims at developing an understanding and appreciation of one’s own local environment as well as the environment which is world-wide in scope. By participation in various physical education activities such as dance, sports and games, a person fully understand the history, culture, tradition, religious practices etc and the aesthetic values associated with these activities

Labels for Special Education Students – A Necessary Evil

The word “label” can cause many parents to cringe inwardly. They often see it as a big sign hung on the back of their child, making them conspicuously different from the rest of the population. Some parents may fear a label will stay with their child for the rest of their lives, preventing both social acceptance and employment opportunities. Others may see a label as some kind of failure in regards to their parenting skills. In fact, no parent wants his/her child to be labeled.

However, labeling may be unavoidable. Getting your child diagnosed is the single most important step in the foundation of his education. If you perform your own evaluation and red flags pop up, it’s time to take action.

Your first call should be to your child’s primary care physician. At well-child check-ups, your doctor will ask questions regarding developmental benchmarks. Benchmarks are guidelines of normal development your child should reach by a certain age. These include expressive language, receptive language, vocabulary, and fine and gross motor skills. Because language development can vary from child to child, physicians may be lax in taking appropriate action for a child who is not reaching benchmarks. As a parent, your intuition should serve you well. Call your local county Child Development Services (CDS) office and request an evaluation. Your CDS case manager will refer you to specialists more suited to diagnosing disabilities.

If your child is already attending school and you are worried about his progress, keep the lines of communication open with his teachers. Many teachers will refer students to the special education department for an evaluation. Regardless of the results of a public school evaluation, you may want to get an unbiased, independent evaluation. Tutoring centers like Sylvan use specialized testing. In this way, you have a back up should the school district decline services.

If your child does have a disability, an appropriate diagnosis is important in order for the state to recognize him as a special education student. State funds ensure support staff will be available to help your child meet the goals listed in his IEP, or Individualized Education Plan. This plan includes any therapeutic services your child may need such as speech, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and adaptive physical education. These services are vital to your child’s success throughout his primary and secondary education.

Sometimes the biggest hurdle is dealing with having your child “singled out” as a special education student. You fear your child will be seen as different, weird, stupid or weak. While there is no easy fix for this issue, being an advocate for your child and his education can alleviate some of those fears. At the primary level, ask the special education teacher about reverse mainstreaming. This process invites mainstream students into the self-contained/special education classrooms. Students who spend time in the specialized classrooms tend to be more accepting of differences because they are allowed to get to know special education students on a personal level. If reverse mainstreaming is promoted regularly, lasting bonds can form between students that will carry over into the mainstream classrooms and all over the school.

Finally, teach your child to advocate for himself. Understanding the cause and reason behind a label can sometimes ease anxiety about being different. Understanding how a specialized program works, even on a basic level, can go a long way in teaching your child to advocate for himself throughout the course of his education.

Dietary Supplements – Facts For Coaches and Physical Educators

The desire and necessity for dietary supplements and substances enhancing performance is as historic as sports. The use of supplements dates back to around 500 B.C. when athletes and warriors would add the livers of deer and hearts of lions to their diet hoping that it would enhance their performance. It was believed that the supplements would make them braver, faster, and stronger. Research work conducted in the early twentieth century shows evidence for the link between dietary supplements and improved performance. This was possible because research gave man a better understanding for how muscles worked and how fuel was used during exercise. The roles of protein, carbohydrates, and fats were also better understood and all this led to more research on dietary enhancement supplements.

The importance of taking supplements following intense exercise is based on the necessity for quicker replenishment of muscle glycogen post workout. By taking a protein, carbohydrate, or protein-carbohydrate supplement after exercise, there is a quicker return to performance capacity and this is important for one under continuous exercise.

Numerous studies on restoring muscle glycogen stores have been conducted. They all address the questions of timing, when to take the supplement; amount of supplementation, specifically gram intake of supplement per day; and the type of supplement to take. In comparing various studies done on the difference between a carbohydrate supplement and a carbohydrate-protein supplement, there is plenty of data suggesting the effect of a carbohydrate-protein supplement to be more effective in restoring muscle glycogen.